long man's walking guide to Sussex

A Compendium of Sussex Walks

Tag: south downs (page 2 of 3)

Long Man of Wilmington Walks

Wilmington’s Mystery of the Long Man (AA) or Alfriston & The Long Man (Fancy Free Walks, PDF).

  • 9.5 miles (Fancy Free Walks)
  • 6.2 miles (10k), 2 and a half hours for the AA walk
  • good pubs and tea rooms in Alfriston (note that this is a short detour off the AA walk) and Litlington (Fancy Free Walk only). Wilmington also has a pub and tea rooms, but these are a short walk away from the start/finish.
  • steep ascent
  • accessible by bus

buscup of teahistoric attraction

Summer landscape image of ancient chalk carving in hillside - The Long Man oif Wilmington

The Long Man of Wilmington

A choice of two excellent walks up to some of the finest Downland in East Sussex, above the historic village of Alfriston, where there are a range of tea shops and pubs.

Both walks start in Wilmington and take you past the tiny and remote Lullington Church,  built from the remains of the chancel of an earlier church that was destroyed by fire. It’s then up to the edge of Lullington Heath,  a rare chalk heathland. Towards the end of the walk, you pass above the mysterious 235 foot hill figure of the Long Man of Wilmington.

The longer Fancy Free walk also takes in the downlannd hamlet of Folkington, as well as Litlington and Alfriston itself.

 

 

 

Black Rabbit Arundel Pub Walk

Arundel Castle

Black Rabbit Walk (Hall & Woodhouse, PDF)

  • 3 miles
  •  starts and finishes at the pub
  • accessible by bus
  • train – combine with Walks in Arundel for longer walk, extending to Arundel

cup of tea

Follows the course of the Arun River from the riverside Black Rabbit pub along a raised bank to the small hamlet of South Stoke and d return enjoying quiet lanes and good views water meadows and towards Arundel Castle.This is one of Hall and Woodhouse’s Public House Walks.

Black Rabbit pub near Arundel

Walks in and around Ditchling

Ditchling Walks

Ditchling Village Green
  • 3 short walks of about one hour, can be combined for longer walks.
  • some stiles, mainly flat
  • pubs and tea rooms in Ditchling and Keymer

cup of tea

These three short walks start from the village green of Ditchling, a historic downland village near Lewes, with Ditchling Beacon, the highest point on the South Downs, as its backdrop. The first walk takes you across fields and past the fine restored windmill,  Oldland Mill. You may want a half-way drink in the Thatched Inn in Keymer. There are fine views towards the downs. The second walk takes you down an old Sussex ‘green lane’ and past some of Ditchling’s fine old houses. The third walk takes you to the village playground, a good way for parents to combine a short walk with children.

The walk descriptions are a little dated, but any changes are largely cosmetic. For example, Dolly’s Pantry is now known as Ditchling Tea Rooms, and Chesterton’s is no more. The tea rooms still make a good stop as does The Bull or The White Horse.

Pyecombe Circular

Saddlescombe Farm

Saddlescombe Farm

Pyecombe Circular

  • 7 miles, 3 and a half hours
  • steep climbs and slopes
  • pub at Pyecombe,  tea rooms at Saddlescombe Farm
  • accessible by bus

buscup of tea

Circular walk on the Downs near Brighton from Pyecombe on the A23. Once away from the road, the walk passes through woods and fine open downland, taking in Newtimber Hill, Saddlescombe Farm  and  the southern slopes of Devil’s Dyke. Saddlescombe Farm is a National Trust owned hidden hamlet in the Downs with 1000 years of history. Pop by the seasonal Hiker’s Rest on the farm for tea and cake, before moving on back to Pyecombe, where you can enjoy a pint and a Pizza in the Plough.

Steyning, Chanctonbury and Washington Walk

Chanctonbury Ring Sussex

Chanctonbury & Washington Walk  (Steyning & Community District Partnership, PDF)

Walking near Steyning, Chanctonbury and Washington (PDF) – South Downs National Park

  • 7 miles, 3-4 hours
  • steep ascent and descent, some stiles
  • good choice of pubs, tea rooms and toilets in Steyning. Option to extend walk to visit pub in Washington.
  • accessible by bus

buscup of tea

Excellent walk rising from Steyning onto the South Downs to Chanctonbury Ring, an iron age hill fort 242m high (791 ft), planted with a ring of trees in 1760. The Great Storm of 1987 did its best to flatten the ring for good but it has now recovered well.

Local legend has it that Chanctonbury Ring was created by the Devil. He can apparently be summoned by running around the clump of trees seven times anti-clockwise. When he appears he will offer you a bowl of soup in exchange for your soul. Probably not the most tempting offer though it can get cold up on the ring in winter!

This is walk three of the Steyning Walks series by the Steyning & District Community Partnership.

 

 

East Brighton Walks: Rottingdean and the Downs East of Brighton

East Brighton Walks (PDF)

St Wulfran's Church Ovingdean

St Wulfran’s Church, Ovingdean

  • variety of walking routes to choose from – from a mile or two to around 8 miles
  • some steep climbs on some of the walks
  • pubs, toilets and tea rooms in Rottingdean, Saltdean and Brighton Marina.
  • accessible by bus

buscup of tea

Part of Brighton and Hove Council’s excellent  ‘Downs on Your Doorstep’ series of leaflets, this leaflet details walking options for exploring the Downs east  of Brighton including the undercliff walk between Brighton Marina and Rottingdean or Saltdean, and inland over the Downs.

Balsdean Church

You can pass the seaside village of Rottingdean where Rudyard Kipling once lived (visit Kipling Gardens for real peace and tranquility), the famous Roedean School, the 11th century  St Wulfran’s Church nestling in the Downs in Ovingdean, and what little is left of the lost village of Balsdean (used as target practice by the military during the Second World War).

Hollingbury Woods Easy Access Trail

Hollingbury Woods Easy Access Trail (PDF)

  • short easy access walk, free from gates and stiles and suitable for buggies, wheelchairs and the less mobile
  • smooth wide path with plenty of benches
  • about one hour walking time
  • on several bus routes

disabled access signbus

Part of Brighton and Hove Council’s excellent  ‘Downs on Your Doorstep’ series of leaflets, this leaflet details a short walk through woodlands on the northern edge of Brighton just off Ditchling Road (the link goes to the more up-to-date version by the South Downs Joint Committee).

The Chattri and the Windmills

Jill Mill on the South Downs

Jill Mill on the South Downs

The Chattri and the Windmills (Brighton & Hove City Council, PDF)

The Chattri (South Downs National Park, PDF)

  • variety of walking routes to choose from – about 5 miles from Patcham to Jack and Jill windmills and back
  • some steep climbs on some of the walks
  • pub and tea rooms in Patcham. Pub at Pyecombe.
  • accessible by bus

buscup of tea

The first of these leaflets is Part of Brighton and Hove Council’s excellent  ‘Downs on Your Doorstep’ series and details walking options for exploring the Downs north of Brighton, including the Chattri –  a downland memorial for Indian soldiers who died in the first world war, and the iconic Jack and Jill windmills sitting high on the downs above the village of Clayton. You can start walks from Patcham on the northern edge of Brighton, Ditchling Road on the way to Ditchling Beacon or the downland village of Pyecombe.

The South Downs National Park leaflet details a 3.75m walk from Patcham, and also includes a walk in nearby Stanmer Park.

 

 

Stanmer and Ditchling Beacon

The Great Wood, Stanmer Park

Bluebells in The Great Wood, Stanmer Park

Stanmer and Ditchling Beacon (PDF)

  • variety of walking routes to choose from – about 7 miles for Stanmer and Ditchling circular walk
  • easy access route of 5 miles suitable for more robust buggies and wheelchairs
  • some steep climbs on some of the walks
  • pub, tea room and toilets in Stanmer village. Pub at Falmer. Ice cream van usually at Ditchling Beacon.
  • accessible by bus and train

disabled access signtrainbuscup of tea

Part of Brighton and Hove Council’s excellent  ‘Downs on Your Doorstep’ series of leaflets, this leaflet details walking options starting from Stanmer Park (or Falmer Train Station), including a more  substantial walk up to Ditchling Beacon, the highest point in East Sussex. Stanmer is a beautiful downland park containing the grade I listed Stanmer House (now partly a pub), the flintstone Stanmer Church and a  quiet village street with a good value tea shop.

Poppies near Ditchling Beacon

Poppies near Ditchling Beacon, July 2016

A profusion of bluebells can be seen on the higher reaches of Stanmer Great Wood during the spring, and you may see poppies in June and July.

Walks around Steyning: River and Countryside Walk

River and Countryside Walk (PDF)

  • 6.5 miles, 3 hours
  • mostly level with some stiles
  • good choice of pubs, tea rooms and toilets in Steyning. None on route.
  • accessible by bus

bus

A circular walk from Steyning along the banks of the River Adur with views of Chanctonbury Ring and Lancing College, returning on the Downslink path. Walk two of the Steyning Walks series by the Steyning & District Community Partnership.

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