long man's walking guide to Sussex

A Compendium of Sussex Walks

Tag: Burpham walk

Amberley, Burpham and North Stoke Walk

Burpham Church

Burpham Church

Amberley, Burpham and North Stoke Walk (PDF, Souths Downs National Park)

  • 10 miles, 5 hours, with a shorter option for a 2.5 mile Amberley Walk.
  • downland walking, no stiles, some gates
  • plenty of pubs and a tea room at Amberley and by Houghton Bridge near the station, plus The George at Burpham.
  • accessible by bus and train

traincup of tea

This is an area of fine downland walking with river valley views, and picturesque villages. The popular pub, The George in the attractive village of Burpham (Local tip: Burpham is pronounced ‘Burrfam’) makes a convenient stopping point at about the halfway mark. Amberley village is a little detour but is a picture postcard village of thatched flint cottages.

Amberley Museum and Heritage Centre, near the start/finish of the walk, is a 36 acre open air museum dedicated to the industrial heritage of the south east. The main chalk quarry at the museum is famous for being the location of the mine in the James Bond film View to Kill. The Bridge Inn and Riverside Cafe Bar are at the start/finish of the walk situated by the river.

For a bit of luxury and history, stay in nearby Amberley Castle!

Note that Amberley Station is at Houghton Bridge, a 15 minute walk away from the village. To visit the extremely attractive and mostly traffic-free village, you’ll need to detour from the main walk or you could do the short walk instead or if you’re feeling fit, add it on to the main walk.

 

 

 

A Pint and a Walk in the Arun Valley at Burpham

A Walk in the Arun Valley (PDF)

  • 4.5 miles, 2 hours
  • mostly easy walking with one moderate climb
  • good village pub in Burpham

cup of tea

The George at Burpham

The George at Burpham

A very pleasant circular walk along the banks of the river Arun, through fields, then up to the Downs where there are magnificent views of the Arun Valley and Arundel, with its castle rising high above the town. This is river and downland walking at its best.

Burpham itself is a small attractive village, at the end of a long road which clings to the eastern side of the River Arun Valley and then stops – meaning there is no through traffic, so it’s great walking. For a pint and a walk (or some good food), the 17th Century George is very popular.